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Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324
Vendor
SHIMANO

SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324

4.7
Regular price
AU$ 180.00
Sale price
AU$ 180.00
Regular price
AU$ 296.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (AU$ 116.00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • Combination clip/clipless pedals ideal for multipurpose use
  • Fully featured SPD-specific clip interface on 1 side of pedals
  • Other side features standard platform for use with street shoes
  • Aluminum body with barrel finish; cleat retention adjuster
  • Includes pair of 2-bolt cleats; pedals weigh 1.17 pounds total

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Customer Reviews

Solid, simple, streamlined designI ride recreationally about 140 miles per week when it's above freezing and not icy.300+ miles on these pedals.Installed 26 June 2016 and I am writing this on 11 July 2016.Pluses:1. Looks like a better clip design than my old slightly cheaper combo pedals, which should give more durability.2. A bit shorter distance horizontally, from threaded stud to outside edge. This is good for me, because I wear size 50 boots and use pedal extenders, so these do not ground out as much while cornering.3. Cage design puts contact on a few points. I rate this a plus because plastic pedals with larger contact areas are slippery in wet conditions. In fact, I have ridden these just once with walking shoes in wet conditions, but I was happy with the friction between the shoe and the cage.4. Looks like you can mount them using either a regular pedal wrench or a hex wrench in the end of the stud. Again, I use pedal extenders, so I have to use a pedal wrench. But I've had other pedals that didn't have flats for a pedal wrench, and that's a deal-breaker.5. Good range of adjustability in clip tension. At zero threads, they are too loose. I have them set at one thread, which is still pretty loose but relatively safe for the city & traffic riding I do. They are easy to clip in and clip out reliably with my generic H20 cleats.6. Clip is raised above cage surface, so they are easy to clip in with my mountain shoes. My others were closer to flush, and clipping in took more finesse.Minuses:7. When flipping over to the cage side, but still riding with cleated shoes, the center bar tends to contact the shoe cleat. I occasionally ride on gravel and other surfaces where clipping in does not seem wise, so I have to position my foot carefully so it does not slip. The cage could be a few mm taller to mitigate the slipping.8. The included cleats are Shimano SH56. I realize they don't want to include multiple cleat types, but I prefer the SH51 style.***I have not been compensated in any way for using the pedals or writing this review.*** 4Fantastic pedals for city commuting / errand running / suicidally dodging trafficThese pedals are nearly ideal for a heavily used city bike. That said, there are some caveats, but they make sense in light of the design tradeoffs that produced them.So, to cover those:1) Due to the cage on these being designed for great grip, if you miss your lock in and then push down off center, you WILL bleed. Seriously, if you wind up giving either of them a cute nickname, it's probably gonna be Spike.2) A number of people have complained about one side or the other not defaulting to being on top, as it doesn't match their preference. In truth, providing you've not managed to gum up the bearings, these come to rest in a vertical orientation. The flat side is to the front, the SPD side is to the back - which I suspect was entirely deliberate because it means you can lock in quickly by pushing forward as you make contact or take off fast on the flat side just by pulling back. Personally, in heavy traffic, I do the latter with my free foot and then flip it over and lock in once I have a little breathing room. For a casual start, I push forward and click right in.3) If you're going to install reflectors, do it after you get the SPD tension set the way you want. With where the adjustment point is, I doubt you'll be able to get to it with them in place.... and now some tips:1) Use a pedal wrench. In case that was unclear, use a pedal wrench. (15mm) I happened to employ a Park Tool PW-5 - Park Tool PW-5 Home Mechanic Pedal Wrench2) Both the way the SPD side and the teeth on the cage side are set up seem to be almost ideal for mating with Chrome's urban SPD shoes. These pedals give a nice, predictable release even after I machined the bottom side of my cleats to match the shoes' sole curvature so they wouldn't chew up floors. (If you do this yourself, I take no responsibility for any injuries / deaths / etc... resulting from it. It was probably a dumb thing for me to have done, but so far it's working.)3) For Pete's sake, don't forget to grease the threads. 5Now I just need one pair of bike shoesI have this type (but not Shimano brand) of one sided SPD-specific clip pedals on my trail bike and had Look pedals on my road bike. That meant two pairs of bike shoes and the Look shoes were difficult to walk in when not on the bike.These Shimano PD-M324 SPD Dual Platform Pedals were very easy to install on my road bike with an Allen Wrench. I applied grease top the threads to make them easy to remove if need be.The aluminum body feels strong and built to last. The clips on the shoes engage effortlessly and the shoes pop out easily with a quick twist of the foot. Even though I almost always use my bike shoes on my road bike I do like having the option of taking a spin on it in regular shoes if necessary.I do a lot of riding in cities and though the shoes clip in and out easily, sometimes in traffic it s just easier to not clip in at all. When not clipped in I still have a solid pedaling platform. That is not the case with smaller, lighter SPD-specific clip pedals. I highly recommend these pedals.It was also a joy to throw away my disintegrating 30-year old Look bicycle shoes 5Decent Pedals but...These were my first clipless pedals but I do have some concerns. They work as expected but I wish I went with a double sided clip mechanism as these are a bit difficult to clip into. I have a 50% chance of finding the clip and not. Once I clip in they are fine though. I got these so I could use regular pedals since I didn't have shoes yet to support clips. Now I do but it doesn't work as well in practice as I thought it may. Conversely, the pedals are just as hard to find when wearing regular shoes too. I would suggest maybe choosing one or the other to those who considered the same thing I did. There is not any issue with the pedal itself, just the premise I suppose. Quality pedals with a good balance to clipless vs pedals side. The pedals do tend to stay perpendicular to the ground consistently but trying to find the right side for the right job is the difficult part. 3Perfect for touringPerfect for touring. If your cleats break somehow or your shoes are worn to the bone during a tour, just wear regular shoes. The dual platform is a lifesaver and makes it so that you can stop easily without fumbling around with your clips.P.S. COMES WITH CLEATS SO DONT BUY CLEATS LIKE I DID OR YOURE JUST GONNA HAVE LIKE A TON OF EXTRA CLEATS 5Good build quality and effective for SPD cleatsThese are my first pedals that attach to a shoe in some fashion. You can adjust the tension to make it easy or harder to exit the pedals. On the lowest tension setting you can pull straight upwards to get out. Good if you are new to these kind of pedals, as you WILL forget to unclip when you are learning. Otherwise at higher tensions you simply twist your heel outboard to get out. You just have to time your stops with pulling a shoe out. The non-SPD side is nice when I just want to get on and take a leisure ride (4-5 miles) 1/2 an hour to an hour after big meal or just tooling about. These pedals along with the shoe I got (Gavin brand) make it much easier to head into the wind. Takes some of the load of your quads and gives some to your hams and calfs. Helps keep your cadence up. Using these on streets and mounted on a trek dual sport. 5Versatile and greatLet's get this out first, these are not meant to be racing pedals. Never have been and never will be. They are too heavy and as some commenters have said, they can scrape the ground on tight corners. BUT, if you are like me and want to use your bike for multiple uses, then these pedals fit the bill perfectly. I have these on a 2009 Cannondale CAAD 9 (which is a pretty bitchin' road bike) but I also use that bike for my 33 mile (one way) commute on Fridays during the spring/summer/fall. Then I love being able to putz around town with regular shoes on and not have to worry about wearing my bike shoes. The platform side is great when coming to a complete stop at stop lights because you don't want to worry about having to clip in when the light goes green and you don't want to clip in if you are going to have to stop again in a block or two.I do plan to do a triathlon this fall and I will use these pedals because I can't afford to buy new pedals just for that purpose and they will work just fine for me. I don't plan on winning anyway.Overall, I'd say that these pedals are great at what they were designed for and would suffice for other uses (racing, mtb, etc) if you need to stretch your $$$. 5Works very well, durable. Highly recommended.I had a set of these on my mountain bike and my wife loved them so I moved them to her bike. Ordered this set to have some on mine again.We are moderate mountain bikers. I've never had an issue with them becoming un-clipped on the trail. It is pretty easy to get clipped in as you are taking off as well. The springs are adjustable so you can adjust if needed. I've never had to adjust them at all.I also like the large space for "normal" shoes for those bike rides around the neighborhoods with the kids. Works well. 5Good Urban PedalI've ridden these pedals for almost a year now, 1500+ miles, with Shimano SH-CT71L shoes. For urban riding they are pretty ideal. It's pretty easy to chose clip or no-clip on the fly, as the pedals are asymmetrically weighted. Easy clip in and out. Easy adjustability. The only downside is that the pedal edges are really tough on the legs. I've scraped my shins numerous times while walking the bike. This is certainly a function of my carelessness and any other multifunction metal pedal will probably be the same. Overall, I'm very happy. 4Great way to transition to SPDNeeded to replace the stock pedals on my Trek 7.2FX hybrid, and got these. Was immediately taken by the desire to try out some SPD shoes, and it is a great way to bike. I picked up a pair of Shimano RT82 recessed cleat shoes, and I love the combo.The pedals themselves feel very well built, though on the heavy side. If you care about weight, Shimano also makes a lighter hybrid SPD/platform pedal.Installation (and removal of the old pedals) is simple. Pedals use an open 15mm wrench (I don't have one, but 5/8" worked well enough for me), and just twist off (the left pedal is left hand thread, so needs clockwise to loosen and counter clockwise to tighten). Once the old ones are off, the new ones just go on in reverse (it is a good idea to put some bike grease on the threads first, to help avoid creaking, and to make it easier to get them off again if you need to). Hand tighten first to make sure you avoid cross threading, and be careful to install on the right side, they are labeled L and R.I think they work very well once they are on. The pedal spindles are greased with a thick lube that while not thick enough to have any noticeable effect on pedaling difficulty, but it means that they will not simply flop over to the heavier side so if the wrong side is up, a half turn of the cranks will correct it.The platform side is your standard bike pedal. It has teeth to help with traction, but won't work well with smooth soled shoes. If you accidentally put a shoe down on the clip side, you'll feel it, but the clip sturdy enough to take that abuse, and doesn't stick out so far that you'll be unable to pedal on it, just switch to the right side at the first opportunity (flip the pedal with your toe, or take your foot off and pedal a half turn with the other foot to get the right side up.)The SPD is where it gets interesting. I hadn't used any type of cleated shoe before, but it is a big improvement. The pedals come with the cleats to install, so put them where they are comfortable on the shoe (you may need to adjust a few times, or you can buy shoes from your local bike shop, and they should be able to size and adjust properly for you). You can also adjust the clip tension with a hex key. I set mine very low since I hadn't used these, and was biking in Manhattan; good to be able to get out of the binding quickly if something goes poorly. The SPD bindings release if you twist out your ankles or pull up in back while keeping your toe down (this can happen in normal pedaling, but even with low tension, only happens to me if my chain skips or something, not ideal, but not a big issue either.) This sounds difficult to do without practice, but is actually very easy, I've never gotten stuck in the pedal, even in panicked moments when cabbies do something stupid. Getting into the pedal is also pretty easy after a few tries. if you miss it, it works well enough to just pedal around and try again. With my shoes, it is also not hard to pedal on the platform side for a bit if you know you are going to be in and out a lot (like in heavy traffic, or lots of stop lights).Being clicked in is very helpful. I find that most of the time, I'm not using the pull up motion, but it is great to have for long uphill stretches or sprinting where you want that extra power.All in all, I highly recommend these unless you are concerned about the weight, in which case there are better options (and of course most who care about weight would want to jettison the platform side all together). 5
SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324

SHIMANO Clipless Pedals SPD Pedal E-PDM324

4.7
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
AU$ 180.00
Sale price
AU$ 180.00
Regular price
AU$ 296.00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (AU$ 116.00)